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April 2015 BSJ

One Summit Conquered continued “I like being able to explain why you need a certain regulation without pulling it straight out of a book,” he said. “A lot of that is having great support from my co-workers, who take the time to explain the little details to me.” When he was “just a kid,” he developed an interest in safe construction from his father, Robert, an interior designer. He then learned basic carpentry, how to lay flooring, and to build sheds and houses. During college, Jaen started doing some roofing inspections for the City of Lakewood, which had suffered a serious hailstorm. He worked with some friends and his older brother Britton, and when the job was done, he said, the Building Official there, Bill Clayton, promised to find them all jobs. As it turned out, the city of Golden, county seat of Jefferson County, had suffered a hailstorm about that time. So a temp job with Jefferson County, Jaen said, “just fell in my lap.” Until then, Jaen was thinking about going on to law school, which he still may do, but with a specific focus now: faulty building construction. Salazar said Jaen is in the right place for that focus. “There is not a better place to learn about who to blame than in a building department,” he said. “You also learn how to do things right.” Doing things the best he could for the contractors and others he worked with was one of the driving factors behind going for all those certifications, Jaen said. The county required the first couple— residential inspector and commercial inspector—and the state then required plumbing inspector soon after. “After a while, I just started getting on a roll,” he said. “And I felt like I was able to do a better job for the customers.” Baker and the others say Jaen has been doing a great job and is now in charge of a major renovation of a local shopping mall. He gets along well with all the contractors, just like he does with his co-workers. Although Salazar admits to some occasional ribbing to toughen him up for the contractors. Jaen takes it in stride. “You have to have thick skin in this business,” Jaen said. Jones says Jaen has been attending the ICC Colorado Chapter meetings—and the 2013 Annual Meeting in Atlantic City—and is just about ready to offer his first code change proposal. He also credits Baker with taking a chance on Jaen. “Not many building departments would take in a 30-year-old inspector, let alone a 22-year-old one,” he said. Jaen said all he is learning now will help him with whatever he decides to do in the future. He knows a good number of building officials are “aging out,” and it will take a lot of young people like himself to take their places. Salazar says being right of college and accustomed to learning new things and working with the most up-to-date technology likely helped Jaen achieve those certifications— and everything else—so quickly. “He gets it done,” Salazar said. “We’re pretty proud of him.” Baker said she would love for Jaen to take over for her someday, but she knows he’ll likely be moving on. Even working at the foothills of the Rockies, she said, “There just aren’t enough mountains for him to climb.” Jaen said he’ll move on, “when I have done all I can for the department and myself.” Baker said she hopes he stays close to the building profession. “He’s just a great young man,” she said. “He makes me very optimistic about the future.” APRIL 2015 | 27 Enhance Your Skills, Build Your Code Knowledge ICC’s training events provide essential knowledge and skills of every facet of building safety. Register for courses on topics that include: • Accessibility • Disaster Preparedness • Plan Review • Residential Inspections • Special Inspector categories • Permit Technician skills • Fire Prevention • Significant Code Changes VIEW UPCOMING EVENTS 15-10904 —*ADVERTISEMENT—


April 2015 BSJ
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