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Innovative Material Reuse: Shipping Containers used as Structural Building Components continued mediate framing, such as meta building systems. Shipping containers are certified for international maritime standards to safely hold 65,000 pounds, or 203 psf. They also are designed to resist dynamic loads during transportation equivalent to 0.8g. These loads exceed the minimum required loads for most non-residential occupancies and imply a factor of safety of at least 2. In addition, certified shipping containers must meet the following: • corner posts are required to resist 33,700 pounds of load; and • stacked nine-containers high, the corner posts of the lowest shipping container must resist 165,000 pounds of load. For improved corrosion resistance due to harsh salts, shipping containers may be painted with lead-based paint. Additionally, discarded shipping containers exposed to the weather may have visible corrosion which can affect connection strength and overall strength. Hazardous materials may have been stored in the repurposed shipping container, and as a result, may expose building occupants to health or other hazards. CERTIFICATIONS AND SUITABILITY FOR REUSE All shipping containers used around the world are certified to conform to the International Convention for Safe Containers (CSC) before being permitted for transport. Transportation and shipping agencies require current certification before the transportation of a shipping container. Additionally, after each use, shipping containers are evaluated for “seaworthiness.” If found to be damaged, they must be repaired and recertified to meet the same requirements as new shipping containers. ICC Evaluation Service recently held a hearing to review proposed Acceptance Criteria AC462—Acceptance Criteria for Shipping Container Building Modules. The criteria— which was approved, outlines a process where ICC-ES will report that the repurposed container will, at a minimum, be seaworthy and conform to CSC standards, including inspections with the following verifications: • the container bears the CSC certification plaque, indicating it was manufactured to the international standard of the “Rules of Standard Intermodal Containers;” and • the repurposed container has been inspected using the established CSC criteria for such items as water tightness, out-of-plane dents, structural damage, warping and material condition. Questions regarding fire resistance and sound attenuation still need to be addressed. However, it is hoped this article helps nudge hesitant code officials from not even considering what appears to be an outlandish request, to looking into how such an innovative idea can be done safely. Ali Fattah is a licensed Civil Engineer in California and is employed by the City of San Diego. He has been active in the Code Council code development process and serves on the ICC ES Evaluation Committee. He also is active with the San Diego Area Chapter of the Code Council code committee and education committee. OCTOBER 2016 | 39 Building Department Accreditation The IAS Building Department Accreditation Program is for government agencies that are proactively seeking to improve their organization. Contact IAS and find out more about becoming an IAS Accredited Building Department. 1-866-427-4422 | www.iasonline.org Helping Building Departments Operate at Optimal Levels INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION SERVICE 15-11562 —*ADVERTISEMENT—


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